Indoor hanging basket

Indoor hanging basket

Plant up an indoor hanging basket to add a new dimension to your houseplant display. You’ll find dozens of small foliage plants and flowering houseplants in the garden centre here in Sherington, Newport Pagnell which will love life in a hanging basket community. You could also try low-maintenance succulents like houseleeks (plant through the outside of the hanging basket and you can make a stylish ball of plants), cacti, or perhaps a cool selection of ferns for a shady spot. Or pack your basket with colour – orchids flower for months, or try streptocarpus, begonias or cyclamen for a brilliant display that looks lovely underplanted with variegated ivy. Pop in to the garden centre today and we’ll be happy to show you lots of options! You’ll find all sorts of basket designs too, as well as terrariums and glass planters which make a pretty feature for a living room.

If you’re using a conventional hanging basket, line it (if it doesn’t already have an integral liner) with moss or a preformed liner from the garden centre. Then fill your hanging container with potting compost, adding a handful of water-retaining granules. A pellet of slow-release fertiliser will also keep your basket performing at its best all winter.

Choose plants with the same light and water requirements to go together, and arrange them so they appear balanced and you’re happy with the display. Odd numbers work well, and make sure you soften the edges with some trailing foliage to cascade over the sides.

Soak the basket thoroughly with tepid water and leave in the kitchen sink to drain. Then choose a bright spot to hang your basket: it should be out of direct sunlight, but providing plenty of light for your plants to grow well. Fix a hook securely into the ceiling, then hang up your basket for everyone to admire.

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